Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD

Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD

Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD

Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD
Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD. Provided with certificate of authenticity. Using Edward Cohen’s rarity scale, this is a rare (R1) shekel, and probably only 500 to 2,000 still exist!! After 2,000 years, this quite rare Half Shekel of Tyre glistens and dances in the light, much more than the usual surviving Half Shekel of the time. The lustrous coin has the typical Half Shekel concavity curve, which disappeared in the later years of Half Shekel production. It’s just a great example of what Half Shekels used to look like when they were in use, two millennia ago. You will note that the obverse of this Half Shekel is not surprisingly a little out of round, but quite well centered, for a Half Shekel of it’s age. The reverse is less typical of coins of the time. It is unusually well centered, without the typically seen eccentric placement on the flan. As you can see from the pictures, every detail of writing and style are easily discernible on the coins. Collectors of coins of the time should note that Half Shekels are much more rare than full Shekels of Tyre. Using Edward Cohen’s rarity scale, this is a rare (R1) shekel, and probably only 500 to 2,000 still exist. This historic coin was struck during the time of Mithridates VI, King of Pontus. Mithridates was the king that invaded Cappadocia, starting the first Mithridatic War with his enemy being the Roman Republic. Mithridates had grown very concerned about Roman power in Anatolia. This resulted in a seemingly spontaneous, but actually, scrupulously planned rebellion against the Romans. They knew that if they didnt succeed, they would face hellish reprisal by the Romans. By good planning and extraordinary bravery, the rebellion was successful, but extremely brutal. Huge numbers of Romans were executed. Considering the population of the time, the numbers compare well to those of the great holocaust of our time. Every Roman and Italian citizen in Asia Minor was massacred. This extermination was planned and executed in a way that no doubt would have gained Hitlers admiration, had he lived in that time. The carnage was so well planned, that it was carried out on the same day in many towns over a wide spread geographic area, including Asia Minor, Ephesus, Pergamon, Adramyttion, Caunus, Tralles, Nysa, and the island of Chios. This, without the ability to communicate between widely scattered forces. Estimates of the number of men, women, and children killed range from 80,000 to 150,000. Mithridates celebrated by having Roman slaves kill their Roman masters, unconditional freedom. Even if they didnt assist in the slaughter, those slaves and Roman servants who spoke languages other than Latin were spared. Mithridates intended genocide, not unbridled murder. The event was extremely costly to the Romans, not only in people, but in funds to retaliate. These funds no doubt contained a number of diverted Shekels and Half Shekels We know that because today, shekels are found, buried in this area, now a portion of Turkey. Rome never wavered where its military and provincial authority was challenged. The Roman Senate quickly committed a huge invasion force aimed at breaking the power of the Kingdom of Pontus. As was typical of the time, Romes power succeeded in annexing Pontus territory after a very long series of conflicts known as the Mithridatic Wars. Far from the war, it became the most important coin in Israel. Eighty years later, Jerusalem would be facing the same plight as Pontus and the little half shekel would be buried and hidden in hoards to protect it from the Romans. Many of these hoards were forgotten, or their owners killed. Then some 2,000 years later, a few very lucky, or curious 19th and 20th century citizens, living on top of the rubble of those long distant wars, would re-discover these treasures, finding sufficient numbers of coins as to make the Half Shekel potentially available to any museum or collector of ancient coins. However, some production years of Half Shekels only rarely appeared in these finds, and some, not at all. This year number 37 Half Shekel was one of these rarely found in the discovered hoards. The total recovered has been no more than 500 and probably much fewer, possibly as few as 25 coins from this rare year of 90/89 BC. Why did coins from Tyre exist in Roman held Jerusalem? The coins are 97% pure silver, the greatest purity of silver in coins locally available during the 193 year span of manufacture. That coin was a full Shekel. Unlike the full Shekel of Tyre it probably was not one of the coins that Judas was given in his bag of 30 pieces of silver. However, the Half Shekel of Tyre has huge significance as the coin that every male Jew handled at least once a year for a span of over a century and a half. Indeed, there are few more historic and more fascinating coins still available, after 2,000 years, especially coins so well validated by the history written at the time. Half Shekels cause us to pause and think deeply about the history we know through books and religious teachings. It was available and in use, in their Temple, and communities for the entire duration of their time on earth. The item “Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD” is in sale since Friday, July 31, 2020. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ Ancient\Other Ancient Coins”. The seller is “buytheway2000″ and is located in Jerusalem. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Period: 126 BC-5AD
  • Cleaned/Uncleaned: Cleaned
  • Modified Item: No
  • Certification: Certified Authenticity Included
  • Shipping: Free Worldwide Shipping
  • Age: Over 2000 years
  • Country: Ancient Judaea
  • Grade: Ungraded
  • Year: 126 BC – 5 AD
  • Provenance: Ownership History Not Available
  • Denomination: Silver Half Shekel

Very Rare Silver Half Shekel Of Tyre Ancient Judea Authentic Old Coin 126 BC-5AD